WP’s weekly tweet note: NFL star? No thanks, I’ll be a financial planner

WP’s weekly tweet note: NFL star? No thanks, I’ll be a financial planner

WP’s weekly tweet note: NFL star? No thanks, I’ll be a financial planner Not many college stars would pass at a chance to be a first-round pick. Kudos to this man for doing just that.
 
Cardale Jones started just three games in Ohio State’s championship-winning season.
 
Fortunately for Jones, who started the past college football season pencilled in as the third-string quarterback, fate would interject itself – Heisman Trophy candidate J.T. Barrett went down with a season-ending injury in late November – and Jones would lead the Buckeyes to arguably its three most important wins of the season.
 
Although a first-round pick was highly unlikely even with the late season heroics, it’s possible Jones could have garnered a fair bit of attention in the second or third rounds. Doing so would have delivered close to a million dollars or more in guaranteed salary. 
 
Jones hails from inner-city Cleveland and is the father of a newborn daughter. The money would definitely come in handy. Instead, he declared to the gathered press last Thursday that not only was he going to return for his senior year at OSU but that it was going to go into financial planning once his playing days were over.
 
Read that again - NFL career or not, Cardale Jones wants to be a financial planner. Forget about being a spokesman for Nike or Gillette, the young man’s ready to make a profound difference in the lives of those people he ultimately chooses as clients.
 
That’s why John Wasik, a contributor with Forbes, gets our nod for WP’s weekly tweet note.
 
Wasik’s tweet via his article in Forbes points out all the reasons why Jones’ declaration is meaningful to the financial planning profession. Long the ugly duckling to the rest of the investment industry, this is a chance for a high profile athlete to put the spotlight on financial planning as a legitimate career.
 
Nothing may come of it. Or, people who would never have considered financial planning as a way to make a living, suddenly will.
 
That’s a very good thing.