Morning Briefing: Sentiment rises following strong Wall Street session

Morning Briefing: Sentiment rises following strong Wall Street session

Morning Briefing: Sentiment rises following strong Wall Street session

Sentiment rises following strong Wall Street session

The Dow gained 150 points Tuesday and has given world markets a dose of positivity for far Wednesday.

Gains for equities have been modest and investors are awaiting the formal start of the UK’s exit from the EU. Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty will be triggered by letter from the British prime minister to the president of the European Council at 7.30am ET but analysts are not expecting any major reactions from markets. The pound has weakened though.

Asian indexes closed with gains for the major markets but Shanghai was the laggard again.

European indexes are mostly higher while London’s FTSE is flat. German import prices data showed increases above expectation.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open higher. US mortgage and oil/gasoline inventory data is due.

 

Latest

1 month ago

1 year ago

 

North America (previous session)

US Dow Jones

20,701.50 (+0.73 per cent)

-0.53 per cent

+17.40 per cent

TSX Composite

15,598.57 (+0.60 per cent)

+1.29 per cent

+16.18 per cent

 

Europe (at 5.00am ET)

UK FTSE

7,344.00 (+0.01 per cent)

+1.11 per cent

+20.28 per cent

German DAX

12,210.40 (+0.50 per cent)

+3.18 per cent

+23.49 per cent

 

Asia (at close)

China CSI 300

3,465.19 (-0.13 per cent)

+0.36 per cent

+10.52 per cent

Japan Nikkei

19,217.48 (+0.08 per cent)

+0.52 per cent

+12.36 per cent

 

Other Data (at 5.00am ET)

Oil (Brent)

Oil (WTI)

Gold

Can. Dollar

51.74

(+0.80 per cent)

48.72

(+0.70 per cent)

1252.10

(-0.28 per cent)

U$0.7485

 

Aus. Dollar

U$0.7658

Young Canadians most targeted by fraudsters

Canadian millennials are the top target for fraudsters, Equifax Canada says.

Its new report shows that younger Canadians were targeted in 49 per cent of all suspected fraudulent applications with 35-50s accounting for 30 per cent and 51-69 year olds targeted in 18 per cent.

"Younger adults are being targeted because too many make it easy for fraudsters to gain access to their personal information," said Tara Zecevic, Equifax Canada's Vice President of Fraud Prevention & Identity Management.

Equifax says that consumers should double-check credit card and bank statements, shred personal and financial documents rather than put them in trash, and maintain strong online security.

"Fraudsters can do a lot of damage with the smallest amount of personal data," adds Zecevic. "It's not necessarily your money they're after. With your personal information, they can open bank accounts, take out credit cards and apply for loans in your name."