Morning Briefing: Markets shaken by Brussels terror attacks

Morning Briefing: Markets shaken by Brussels terror attacks

Morning Briefing: Markets shaken by Brussels terror attacks Markets shaken by Brussels terror attacks
A series of bomb blasts in the Belgian and European Union capital have resulted in at least 23 deaths and multiple injuries. It’s believed that four blasts occurred at one of the city’s main airports while another went off near the EU buildings and there are also reports of explosions at a number of metro stations. A Belgian official has confirmed that the attacks at the airport were carried out by at least one suicide bomber.

European stock markets are lower following the news, which has overshadowed stronger PMI data for the Eurozone released Tuesday.

Asian markets closed with losses with Tokyo outperforming its peers to close almost 2 per cent higher as the yen weakened.

Oil prices have slipped slightly but both Brent and US crude remain above $41 this morning.
Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open lower following the Brussels blasts.
 
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 17,623.87 (+0.12 per cent) +7.52 per cent -2.78 per cent
TSX Composite 13,561.09 (+0.47 per cent) +5.57 per cent -9.24 per cent
 
Europe (at 5.30am ET)
UK FTSE 6,157.82 (-0.43 per cent) +1.99 per cent -12.31 per cent
German DAX 9,897.23 (-0.52 per cent) +3.38 per cent -17.79 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,225.79 (-0.73 per cent) +3.43 per cent -17.13 per cent
Japan Nikkei 17,048.55 (+1.94 per cent) +6.77 per cent -12.84 per cent
 
Other Data (at 6.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
41.45
(-0.22 per cent)
41.43
(-0.22 per cent)
1252.60
(+0.68 per cent)
U$0.7652
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7595

Another bank investigation
German tax authorities have begun an investigation into Citigroup. The bank says that the probe relates to dividend stripping, where stocks are bought just before dividend rights expire and then sold. There were tax benefits for both buyer and seller but that has since been changed. Reuters reports that Citigroup denies that it has ever been involved in the practice but has acted as a settlement agent for clients without knowledge of what those trades were.