Morning Briefing: Markets climb as Clinton cleared

Morning Briefing: Markets climb as Clinton cleared

Morning Briefing: Markets climb as Clinton cleared Markets climb as Clinton cleared
The world’s stock markets have reacted positively to the news that the FBI has cleared Hillary Clinton in its probe into her use of a private email server.

Asian indexes closed with broad gains, led by Tokyo and Sydney, as investors’ hope of a Clinton win rose.

The sentiment is being shared by Europe with markets trending higher. London and Germany are the strongest so far, the latter shaking off data showing weaker industrial orders in September; quarterly figures were more positive.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open higher.

Oil prices and the Canadian dollar are higher.
 
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 17,888.28 (-0.24 per cent) -1.93 per cent -0.12 per cent
TSX Composite 14,509.25 (-0.51 per cent) -0.39 per cent +7.05 per cent
 
Europe (at 4.30am ET)
UK FTSE 6,782.12 (+1.33 per cent) -3.72 per cent +6.74 per cent
German DAX 10,424.48 (+1.61 per cent) -0.63 per cent - 5.13 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,356.59 (+0.07 per cent) +3.18 per cent -11.51 per cent
Japan Nikkei 17,177.21 (+1.61 per cent) +1.88 per cent -10.84 per cent
 
Other Data (at 2.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
46.10
(+1.14 per cent)
44.75
(+1.54 per cent)
1285.30
(-1.47 per cent)
U$0.7456
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7674

 
Peso gains on Clinton news but Mexico is ready for Trump
The Mexican peso rose overnight following the FBI’s latest decision that Hillary Clinton will not face charges regarding her email.

While it may be good news for now, there is still a real chance of a Trump presidency which would almost certainly be bad news for America’s neighbours to the south.

The governor of Mexico’s central bank told Mexico’s Milenio TV that officials have a contingency plan if their powerful critic gains the White House.

"If the adverse scenario manifests itself, it's possible that Mexican authorities will respond in some way," Agustin Carstens told the broadcaster.

He gave no further details of what the plan might be but said he hoped it won’t be needed.