Morning Briefing: Asian markets down, Pound slips on Scotland vote fears

Morning Briefing: Asian markets down, Pound slips on Scotland vote fears

Morning Briefing: Asian markets down, Pound slips on Scotland vote fears Asian markets down, Pound slips on Scotland vote fears
World markets have started the week with some volatility as economic and political concerns dominate.

Asian indexes closed broadly lower Monday with Shanghai and Tokyo both of by almost 1 per cent and the other major markets also losing ground.

Among the concerns are Donald Trump’s speech to Congress Tuesday and the ongoing fallout from Britain’s decision to leave the EU.

The British pound fell in early trading as fears grew regarding the possibility of a break-up of the United Kingdom with increased calls for a second independence referendum in Scotland, which could be called by the Scottish parliament next month when the UK is expected to formally begin the Brexit process.

European equities are trending higher on positive data but the merger between stock market operators in London and Frankfurt is looking shaky as the London exchange said it could not meet the antitrust requirements of the EU.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open slightly lower. Data on US durable goods orders, and US home sales is due.
 

 

Latest

1 month ago

1 year ago

 

North America (previous session)

US Dow Jones

20,821.76 (+0.05 per cent)

+3.62 per cent

+25.13 per cent

TSX Composite

15,533.46 (-1.57 per cent)

-0.27 per cent

+21.38 per cent

 

Europe (at 5.00am ET)

UK FTSE

7,258.07 (+0.20 per cent)

+1.05 per cent

+19.29 per cent

German DAX

11,815.63 (+0.10 per cent)

+0.00 per cent

+24.60 per cent

 

Asia (at close)

China CSI 300

3,446.22 (-0.80 per cent)

+1.72 per cent

+17.03 per cent

Japan Nikkei

19,107.47 (-0.91 per cent)

-1.85 per cent

+18.03 per cent

 

Other Data (at 5.00am ET)

Oil (Brent)

Oil (WTI)

Gold

Can. Dollar

56.72

(+1.30 per cent)

54.50

(+0.94 per cent)

1256.50

(-0.14 per cent)

U$0.7626

 

Aus. Dollar

U$0.7680



Trump accusations over China’s currency won’t be official say experts
The US Treasury will publish its monitoring list in April but experts don’t believe it will say that China is deliberately devaluing the yuan.

CNBC’s survey of economists and strategists reveals that most believe the Trump administration will not make an official accusation despite previous comments made by the president.

Experts say that giving China an official tag as a currency manipulator would be inflammatory and lead to increased protectionism on both sides.
 

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