Veteran Nova Scotia advisor calls for action from his peers

Veteran Nova Scotia advisor calls for action from his peers

Veteran Nova Scotia advisor calls for action from his peers  The Golden Rule to do right by clients has held Nova Scotia advisor Howard Williams in good stead for more than 30 years. But, in general, are advisors doing enough?

The Halifax-based Investors Group advisor first came to the attention of WP through an email he sent expressing frustration with the plight of low-income households. Blessed with a lengthy career that’s kept him busy helping people build their financial resources, Williams feels compelled to help those having a tough time making a go of it.

Philanthropic endeavours by advisors both in the context of helping others but also in encouraging clients to do the same by spreading their good fortune is what life’s all about. Later today we’ll speak to WP Top 50 Advisor Sybil Verch about charitable giving. Next week we’ll have something to say about our conversation.

Howard’s email has gotten the ball rolling.

Putting philanthropy aside for a moment, Williams is definitely passionate about financial planning. Growing up less fortunate, he truly enjoys helping people of all income brackets better their financial situations.

“I try my best to turn as many in the right direction [those with low incomes] as I can. A lot of the people who have more investable assets have been blessed with better guidance along the way although we find even they can use some help.”

Ultimately, he simply enjoys working with people, no matter their financial status. People are people.

When asked about CRM2, a subject with no shortage of coverage in financial media today, Williams addressed the coming changes head on.

“People don’t mind paying [fees] if you’re doing a darn good job for them. It’s the same as a lawyer. If he or she is doing a good job you don’t mind paying them what you consider a fair price. So, I tell [new clients] them straight up what it’s going to cost you [to do business] through my company.”

Williams goes further mentioning fiduciary duty, a subject that’s in the press these days thanks to President Obama.

“I also tell them I’m going to service this [portfolio] for you, I’m going to monitor this for you, to make sure you get the best bang for the buck. That is my job. It’s my fiduciary responsibility.”

Whether we’re talking about service to clients or mankind in general, Howard Williams bends over backwards for those less fortunate. He’ll provide the same service for the person opening a $100 PAC as he does for the client with significant investable assets.

He lives by the Golden Rule.

Are you doing the same?
 
2 Comments
  • Harley Lockhart CLU CHFC 2015-02-27 2:48:16 PM
    I suspect Howard's income depends on the commissions embedded in the investment products he provides. How many of his $100 PAC clients could afford his services if he can no longer depend on commissions?
    I believe there are many advisors with an attitude similar to Howard. Making regulatory changes without considering the impact on these advisors and consequently their clients is a huge disservice to all Canadians.
    Post a reply
  • Will Ashworth 2015-03-02 11:21:19 AM
    Good points, Harley. The conversation on embedded comp is not over by a longshot.
    Post a reply