Not all millennials are opposed to stocks

Not all millennials are opposed to stocks

Not all millennials are opposed to stocks Kennedy Summers got hooked on stocks early. She now uses day trading to supplement her income – something all millennials can take to heart. "I love trading. I can wake up and make sure I can make money and still pay my rent,” Summers says. “I got hooked on it.”

In contrast to this unbridled enthusiasm for the markets, Goldman Sachs’ recent survey of millennials and their attitude towards financial services found that only 19 per cent of respondents believe that stocks are the best way to save for retirement.

The L.A. resident starts her day in front of her trading screen at 5 a.m. Pacific time. In between trading only the most active of stocks which have both the volume and volatility to make quick gains (and losses), Summers picks the brain of Cyber Trading University teacher Fausto Pugliese looking for stock trades in the days ahead.

By late morning the 28-year-old is ready to get to work on her true vocation of modeling and acting. Crowned Playboy’s 2014 “Playmate of the Year,” this particular bunny isn’t just a pretty face. A graduate of Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia, after school she moved to Milan to do some modelling and then attended medical school in Curacao staying for two-and-a-half years before getting bored and returning to Los Angeles where she fell into the Playboy gig.
 
"I want to continue day trading. I want to trade my own funds,” Summers says. “This year, I want to live in London. I can work the market from two to three [in the afternoon]. I love the freedom and the flexibility." 
 
A future advisor in the making? Only Summers knows for sure but she’s definitely one of the 19 per cent.