Morning Briefing: World stocks slip as corporate issues dominate

Morning Briefing: World stocks slip as corporate issues dominate

Morning Briefing: World stocks slip as corporate issues dominate World stocks slip as corporate issues dominate
Regional earnings and other corporate issues are dominating the markets so far Friday. Meanwhile, oil is down around 0.5 per cent on rising US inventories but gold has gained around 0.5 per cent on Trump policy concerns.

Asian market closed mostly lower with a new development in the South Korean influence scandal with two executives from Samsung offering to resign. Tokyo was under pressure from a stronger yen but Shanghai managed to see a slim gain.

European indexes are trending lower amid weaker-than-hoped corporate earnings and recent data. Banking and media stocks are among the weaker performers.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open mixed. Canadian GDP data and US new home sales figures are due.
 

 

Latest

1 month ago

1 year ago

 

North America (previous session)

US Dow Jones

20,810.32 (+0.17 per cent)

+4.51 per cent

+26.24 per cent

TSX Composite

15,781.20 (-0.31 per cent)

+1.09 per cent

+23.87 per cent

 

Europe (at 5.00am ET)

UK FTSE

7,251.28 (-0.28 per cent)

+1.41 per cent

+23.59 per cent

German DAX

11,897.81 (-0.64 per cent)

+2.38 per cent

+29.49 per cent

 

Asia (at close)

China CSI 300

3,473.85 (+0.02 per cent)

+3.25 per cent

+11.72 per cent

Japan Nikkei

19,283.54 (-0.45 per cent)

+2.64 per cent

+21.16 per cent

 

Other Data (at 5.00am ET)

Oil (Brent)

Oil (WTI)

Gold

Can. Dollar

56.25

(-0.58 per cent)

54.16

(-0.53 per cent)

1257.00

(+0.45 per cent)

U$0.7637

 

Aus. Dollar

U$0.7705
 


Border tax would be good for US jobs says Trump
President Trump said Thursday that a republican-backed border tax would lead to “a lot more jobs in the United States.”

Speaking to Reuters, the president appeared to be firming his opinion on the idea, which he had previously said could be an option but also called “too complicated.”

He also repeated his call for US companies to return back to the States, warning that he supported a 35 per cent tax on those that move abroad to more favourable tax regimes.

Reuters reports that talk of a border tax is dividing businesses with retailers’ stocks losing ground Thursday.