Morning Briefing: World markets mixed following US jobs

Morning Briefing: World markets mixed following US jobs

Morning Briefing: World markets mixed following US jobs World markets mixed following US jobs
The weaker-than-expected US jobs data released Friday is in focus this morning as world markets look for signals for a potential US interest rate rise.

The Fed’s meeting next week is not broadly expected to bring a change in interest rates, but it could. If not, then analysts are gearing up for a July increase.

The expectation for July has heightened following a speech given in Finland Monday by Boston Fed president Eris Rosengren. He told a conference of the Global Interdependence Center that “choppy” economic data and uncertainty over the UK ‘Brexit’ vote is likely to delay a rate rise until July or even September.

In the meantime, the greenback’s rise has eased and gold prices have moved higher. Oil is also up Monday as the weaker dollar combines with fresh supply concern over tension in Nigeria.

Asian markets closed mixed with Shanghai and Tokyo the main losers – Japan’s exporters once again impacted by the yen strengthening against the US dollar - and Sydney and Hong Kong gaining. Seoul is closed for a public holiday.

In Europe, markets are higher. Mining stocks have gained along with energy firms as prices rise.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open higher.
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 17,807.06 (-0.18 per cent) +0.37 per cent -0.24 per cent
TSX Composite 14,226.78 (+0.64 per cent) +3.83 per cent -4.88 per cent
 
Europe (at 5.30am ET)
UK FTSE (previous) 6,256.57 (+0.76 per cent) +2.14 per cent -8.05 per cent
German DAX 10,128.16 (+0.25 per cent) +2.62 per cent -9.55 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,178.79 (-0.33 per cent) +1.55 per cent -39.23 per cent
Japan Nikkei 16,580.03 (-0.37 per cent) +2.94 per cent -18.97 per cent
 
Other Data (at 5.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
50.21
(+1.15 per cent)
49.16
(+1.11 per cent)
1243.30
(+0.03 per cent)
U$0.7724
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7358
 
Internet can’t cope with cyber crime says expert
Financial institutions being hit by cyber crime is inevitable because it’s not what the internet was made for. That’s according to a leading cyber expert who told CNBC: "The internet was never designed to be secure….the criminals have taken advantage of the weaknesses which are inherent in this kind of network of networks.”

Professor Sir David Omand, Commissioner at the Global Commission on Internet Governance said Monday that the big challenge is to make the internet secure, especially as the Internet of Things spreads, creating greater vulnerability.