Morning Briefing: US election dominates, oil slips further

Morning Briefing: US election dominates, oil slips further

Morning Briefing: US election dominates, oil slips further US election dominates, oil slips further
Investors remain concerned about the US presidential election and equities are expected to be subdued over the next few sessions.

Meanwhile oil and gold have both slipped overnight.

Many Asian markets saw a sharp sell-off Friday with Tokyo and Sydney seeing the largest drops as some polls continue to suggest either candidate could be next in the White House.

European markets are also trending lower with London and Frankfurt taking the biggest hits so far. Added uncertainty over Brexit has also shaken the markets with the British government set to challenge yesterday’s court decision that parliament must vote on exiting the EU.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open lower. US jobs data is due this morning at 8.30am ET.
 
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 17,930.67 (-0.16 per cent) -1.77 per cent +0.07 per cent
TSX Composite 14,583.42 (-0.08 per cent) +0.43 per cent +6.75 per cent
 
Europe (at 4.30am ET)
UK FTSE 6,703.73 (-1.28 per cent) -5.24 per cent +4.54 per cent
German DAX 10,224.20 (-0.98 per cent) -3.72 per cent - 5.73 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,354.17 (-0.32 per cent) +3.10 per cent -7.56 per cent
Japan Nikkei 16,905.36 (-1.34 per cent) +1.85 per cent -9.52 per cent
 
Other Data (at 2.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
46.18
(-0.37 per cent)
44.59
(-0.16 per cent)
1302.80
(-0.04 per cent)
U$0.7459
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7684

 
Fed interest rate odds rise
December has been the most-expected option for the Fed to increase interest rates for some time but that expectation is now approaching 80 per cent.

Bond traders are anticipating a strong jobs report Friday which would likely tip the balance in favour of a rate increase next month. The rise in expectation for a December rise increased from 69 per cent a week ago to 78 per cent this week, according to a Bloomberg poll.