Morning Briefing: Oil slide knocks world markets

Morning Briefing: Oil slide knocks world markets

Morning Briefing: Oil slide knocks world markets Oil slide knocks world markets
Equities are broadly lower so far Thursday as falling oil prices and the Fed’s likely interest rate hike are in focus.

Oil has slipped over the past 24 hours following a 6 per cent rally earlier in the week. US stockpiles are higher than expected and there are mixed opinions on the potential outcome of the forthcoming OPEC meeting.

Meanwhile, investors are weighing the likelihood that the Fed will increase interest rates when it meets in December.

Asian indexes closed essentially flat as the markets take stock of the current climate.

For European indexes, Eurozone inflation data shows a strong gain year-over-year in October with the monthly gain just under the expectation. British data on retail sales continued to defy those expecting a Brexit-fuelled slowdown.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open higher. US consumer price data is in focus.
 
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 18,868.14 (-0.29 per cent) +4.02 per cent +7.92 per cent
TSX Composite 14,733.22 (-0.16 per cent) +0.94 per cent +10.94 per cent
 
Europe (at 4.30am ET)
UK FTSE 6,764.43 (-0.22 per cent) -2.64 per cent +7.91 per cent
German DAX 10,631.38 (-0.30 per cent) +1.22 per cent -3.10 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,436.53 (+0.20 per cent) +4.84 per cent -8.56 per cent
Japan Nikkei 17,862.63 (+0.00 per cent) +5.70 per cent -9.01 per cent
 
Other Data (at 2.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
46.82
(+0.41 per cent)
45.71
(+0.31 per cent)
1227.20
(+0.27 per cent)
U$0.7453
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7467

 
JP Morgan Chase set for $200 million settlement over Chinese children
The three-year investigation into JP Morgan Chase’s alleged hire of children of Chinese decision makers could be about to end.

The probe focused on whether the bank broke anti-bribery laws and sparked calls for US law to be applied to its companies when operating overseas.

Sources close to the matter told the Chicago Tribune that the bank will pay around $130 million to the SEC and $70 million to the US Justice Department to settle the matter. Neither the bank or any employees will face criminal charges, the sources said.