Morning Briefing: Choppy trade as markets eye data, oil

Morning Briefing: Choppy trade as markets eye data, oil

Morning Briefing: Choppy trade as markets eye data, oil Choppy trade as markets eye data, oil
Equity markets are mixed so far Thursday as data is weighed and oil prices remain volatile.

Asian markets are focused on Japan’s central bank amid hopes of new stimulus when it meets next week, the Fed is also in focus. Tokyo closed lower due to a strengthening yen. Sydney was up despite weaker-than-expected employment data.

Markets in China, Taiwan and South Korea are closed for public holidays.

European indexes are cautious ahead of central bank meetings next week and today’s interest rate decision from the Bank of England. The announcement from governor Mark Carney is due at 7am ET but no change is expected. The UK has released data this morning showing an easing of retail sales in August compared to July while year-over-year figures beat expectations.

Wall Street and Toronto are expected to open slightly higher ahead of US retail sales data.
 
  Latest 1 month ago 1 year ago
 
North America (previous session)
US Dow Jones 18,034.77 (-0.18 per cent) -2.92 per cent +10.16 per cent
TSX Composite 14,366.46 (+0.12 per cent) -2.78 per cent +6.71 per cent
 
Europe (at 4.30am ET)
UK FTSE 6,674.94 (+0.02 per cent) -3.84 per cent +8.75 per cent
German DAX 10,380.37 (+0.02 per cent) -3.34 per cent +1.89 per cent
 
Asia (at close)
China CSI 300 3,238.73 (-0.66 per cent) -4.56 per cent +2.74 per cent
Japan Nikkei 16,405.01 (-1.26 per cent) -2.75 per cent -8.99 per cent
 
Other Data (at 2.30am ET)
Oil (Brent) Oil (WTI) Gold Can. Dollar
45.89
(+0.09 per cent)
43.53
(-0.11 per cent)
1323.10
(-0.23 per cent)
U$0.7562
 
Aus. Dollar
U$0.7457

US economy $1 trillion worse off under Trump says study
If America elects Donald Trump to the White House it could take a $1 trillion hit on its economy according to a new study.
Oxford Economics, a commercial venture connected to the UK’s famous university, predicts that the policies that the presidential hopeful has set out would see a 5 per cent reduction in GDP for the US, assuming he was able to implement them all.
Imposing higher trade tariffs on other countries is the policy that the economists at Oxford believe would have the largest direct impact on GDP and could have serious implications for emerging economies too.